It's not over

...just because Clinton says so. This is a dirty, dirty play on the part of the U.S., and entirely expected. The specific details of the agreement remain to be seen, but one thing we already knew is laid bare: coups d'etat and illegitimate elections happen at the U.S.'s pleasure. Without control of the institutions that have been dedicated to violently repressing the people of Honduras since June 28th, without a guaranteed constituyente and without the ability to call coup supporters--including the two primary presidential candidates--to account (and I'm not talking some watered-down "truth commission"), Zelaya's return at this point (no disrespect to him) has the potential to do more harm than good for future of democracy in Honduras, and that is why Hillary Clinton wants it.

I hope I'll be wrong about this 4am analysis. It wouldn't be the first time.

Comments

The harm is real!

Jari Dixon has a similar take on this issue He asked several people, would the President have any warranty that the deputies that deposed him would rectify now? Mr. Rivera Rodil, Zelaya’s representative, said that the risk must be taken and that the President knew what he was doing. While Zelaya himself answered that it was not Congress who was going to decide the restitution but ratify only the accord both parties signed regarding this point.

We have accomplished a lot in this four months, against all odds. I am giving Zelaya the benefit of doubt regarding his political calculations since he has managed to still be useful for the Honduran cause.

The struggle does not end with Zelaya’s return to the presidential palace and powerless.

If Zelaya is finally returned to “power”, all candidates threatening to resign from the current election would not have a much solid argument keeping them in the same line. The adverse condition against real democracy and “fair” elections are going to continue. With in the golpista calculation was to wait for the army to be under TSE control and not longer under the presidency command.

Yesterday's repression proved my fears. Even though Unificación Democrática (UD) requested permission in writing to the TSE to make a public march and the TSE granted, the Army and National Police didn’t let the march start as schedule and was repressed later on. Cesar Ham appeared that night in Channel 36 showing the written approval for the march while explaining that the police and army did not agree with the approved route. He tried to get an explanation from TSE officials but he never got a response.

Another issue is that the only candidate without representation in the voting stations is the independent candidate, Carlos H. Reyes. How do we keep the left leaning, progressive movement together to face the elections under this unfair condition? The longer it takes Zelaya to return to the presidency, the longer it takes to have an answer to this question I am afraid.

We are going for the constituent assembly; that is our current final goal. I hope we are able to administer our decisions and emotions wisely and in a productive manner so that the goal is accomplished sooner than later.

VENCEREMOS!

Honduras will never return to the status quo

That's the achievement of the last four months. Ironically enough, the U.S. government's tacit support for the regime's time-killing strategy set the conditions for that permanent step forward.

Obama and Clinton won't ever acknowledge the price that's been paid, but we don't have to go along with their pretense of a return to "normal".

The struggle for a constitutional assembly has already begun, and continues.

Isis Obed Murillo.
¡Presente!

Pedro Magdiel Muñoz.
¡Presente!

Roger Vallejo.
¡Presente!

Wendy Avila.
¡Presente!

Jairo Sanchez.
¡Presente!

Antonio Leiva.
¡Presente!

Olga Ucles.
¡Presente!

Mario Contreras.
¡Presente!

Eucebio Fernandez.
¡Presente!

There are many other martyrs of the resistance present in the struggle. Let us honor them all and inspire renewed solidarity.

I sure hope it's not over..

I can only hope that La Resistencia has enough momentum now to see a Primera Urna or similar through. Perhaps social and political change can still happen. It would be an unspeakable wasted sacrifice on the part of true Hondurans if we returned to the status quo.